Tag Archives: maple

End Grain “Dad” Cutting Board

I made this cutting board for my dad for Christmas this year. It’s maple and mahogany.

1 - Sanded and Oiled

 

 

I started with these mahogany and maple boards from Menards.

2 - Mahogany and Maple Strips

I first ripped them to be the same width as they were thick. (3/4 inch) and then cut them into foot long lengths.

3 - Shorter square strips

I then set up a fence on the cross cut sled and cut the sticks into smaller blocks.

4 - Cutting small blocks on the cross cut sled

 

 

And soon I had a whole pile of blocks to work with.

 

5 - Lots of blocks

 

I arranged them like they were pixels to say “DAD” and made a simple frame from some scraps of plywood. The frame is to aid in clamping.

6 - Doing a dry fit

Caroline helped me get everything glued and clamped.

7 - My wife helped glue and clamp it

 

Once the glue was dry I sanded everything and then soaked it with mineral oil to help protect it.

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Maple Syrup 2011: Round Two – April Syrup

I thought that the sap had just about finished running back in March when we made syrup last time much to our delight however, a quick freeze and a week of warm days produced a 2.5 gallon encore of maple tree sap!

If you squint just right at this first picture you can see that the bucket is almost exactly 1/2 full. That means we’re starting with 2.5 gallons of sap (this is a 5 gallon bucket).

2.5 gallons of Maple Sap
2.5 gallons of Maple Sap

 

While Home Depot calls this a Homer bucket, in reality it can only hold a tiny fraction of a Homer (0.086 homers)

1/2 a bucket of clear Fridley Maple Sap!
1/2 a bucket of clear Fridley Maple Sap!

I think this batch’s sap must’ve had a much higher sugar content. For one thing the sap actually browned as it turned into syrup. It also made a lot more of it! I used a candy thermometer again and took it off the stove when it reached 220 degrees Fahrenheit. It had the desired maple flavor this time instead of the good-and-sweet-but-not-quite-mapley flavor of last time.  As I took it off the stove it seemed too thin, but as it cooled it did thicken up.

Home Grown Fridley's Own Maple Syrup!
Home Grown Fridley's Own Maple Syrup!

As the sap was boiling I knew I needed to filter it to remove the particulate that is making it cloudy. The only thing I had on hand was some cheesecloth, so I used some cheesecloth folded over to about 8 layer thick to filter it as I poured it into this syrup jar. It did remove some particulate, but not enough. As you can see, the syrup is still cloudy. After a few days the particulate settled out, but obviously I’ll need to find an appropriate filter for next year.

We cooked this down on April 2. That afternoon we had some friends over and Caroline made scones for us all to enjoy!

That’s it for Maple production in Fridley this year. Join us again next year when we do it again! Except we’ll do it right next time! And make even more syrup!

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March Maple Madness!

On Saturday I decided it was time to boil the sap that we had collected from our maple tree and see how it turned out. We ended up with about 2.5 gallons of sap in the bucket. 2.5 gallons just happens to be 40 cups. Since the sap supposedly needs to reduce down 40:1, I figured we would probably have about a cup of sap.

Although I have heard that maple steam can get a kitchen sticky I decided to boil it in the kitchen anyways. It turned out fine even if it did produce a lot of steam. I filled up this pot, and turned up the heat. As the sap boiled off and made room for more, I kept adding sap till it was all in there. The thermometer is waiting for 119.5 degrees. Ohio State University has a page which says that syrup will be ready when it reaches 7.5 degrees Fahrenheit above boiling, with our elevation that temperature ended up being 119.5 degrees.

Boiling Maple Sap From our Fridley Maple Tree
Boiling Maple Sap From our Fridley Maple Tree

It started out so thin and watery that I thought maybe water had gotten into the bucket somehow. Once it started steaming I could smell that it was maple sap. Eventually it boiled down to a white foamy goo, and Caroline started cooking pancakes.

Finishing off the maple, and starting on the pancakes
Finishing off the maple, and starting on the pancakes

I took it off when it reached 220 degrees even though it wasn’t maple-syrup-brown. It ended up being a very light brown — almost still white. I’m guessing that I needed to cook it more. Here’s the syrup in our syrup jar.

Ryan isn't quite pleased with how much syrup turned out
Ryan isn't quite pleased with how little syrup turned out

We thought that maybe if we put little pancakes on little plates it would look like we had more syrup. There ended up being 3/4 cup syrup which was enough for everyone to have a tasty little snack.

A nice stack of flapjacks with homemade Maple Syrup!
A nice stack of flapjacks with homemade Maple Syrup!

 

I had a lot of fun making the syrup. Next year I will definitely be looking to tap friends and neighbor’s trees if they will let me! It really wasn’t difficult and the results were delicious!

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