Category Archives: Something Interesting

Spokeshave Spoon with Kolrosing

I recently came across a video of a woodworking technique called Kolrosing. You cut slits into the wood, then rub fine dark powder into the slits. Traditionally you’d rub coal dust into the cuts, but people have used coffee grounds or other materials. You then use oil to seal the wood, trapping the dust in the cuts.

I started this spoon at a scout campout earlier this year with my son. I’d just gotten a spokeshave and thought I’d like to make a spoon where I did all the shaping just with the new tool. The spokeshave was probably a little large for making spoons and I couldn’t make a very tight concave curves with it. The result was a chunky spoon with just a suggestion of a handle.

I brought the spoon with me to another scout camp this fall. While my son was off earning merit badges I worked on finishing the spoon. I used a pocket knife and some carving knives to carve “2017 Many Point 906” into the handle. Many Point was the scout camp, 906 was the troop number.

I used ashes from the fire pit at camp to color the lines. It seemed fitting for a scout camp spoon.

I hadn’t brought any mineral oil or anything to finish the spoon with, but I did have a handy travel size tube of mint scented food-safe vitamin-e and beezwax. Mint chapstick. I had mint chapstick with me. So, I used that to finish the spoon and gave it to a scout leader who had worked hard to put the camp on for the boys.

The wood is apple wood, and it was one of my last couple of apple logs which I got 5ish years ago now. I think I have two more spoon sized pieces in the garage. At least they’re nice and dry.

I really liked the kolrosing technique. I’ve been interested in learning and trying out wood decorating techniques and kolrosing was an easy start. I think something with a looser grain than apple wood would’ve worked better. Or maybe a wood that wasn’t so dried out. It didn’t seem to split apart as well as the cuts in the videos I watched.

Also, I bet I do a better job next time!


Here’s the first video I saw about kolrosing. Also, I love the shirt in the video: Because a kid without a knife is a kid without a life. If you’d like to learn more about kolrosing, also check out this “Basics of Kolrosing” website.

 

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Maple Bowl with Walnut Handles

Over the last two weekends I made this bowl.

It’s made from a maple crotch, so there’s a big bark inclusion going right down the middle, and you can see the center rings from both forks, one on each side of the bowl.

It’s been a while since I did any turning, and I had to re-learn the right feel of how to present the tool on the work, especially with the bowl gouge when working the inside.

Here’s how it ended up after last Saturday. There were several rings and gouges that I wasn’t really happy with, but it was getting late and I wasn’t getting any better.

I left it on the faceplate though, so that I could put it back on the lathe later if I felt more motivated.

Well, the weekend passed and I decided that I wasn’t going to be satisfied with how thick the walls were, or the big gouge marks, so I put it back on the lathe and started thinning things down.

I did have several more catches which ruined the rim and I had to make the bowl shorter to clean them up. You can see that the bark inclusion is now all the way through the rim, where there had been solid wood on the rim before.

Unfortunately this meant that the bowl was much weaker. I actually tightly wrapped the bowl in masking tape while turning the insides so it wouldn’t fly apart. The base was screwed to the faceplate too, so there was enough support.

In fact, once I took the tape off, I could grab both sides of the bowl and make pull them apart a little bit. To compensate for the weakness I drilled two holes on each side of the crack on each side of the bowl, and made these walnut handles from a log I had sitting around. The handles have pegs that fit into the holes in the bowl. I put some watered-thinned wood glue in the crack, and then glued the handle pegs into the holes.

After that, I did one more pass with 1200 grit sandpaper and wiped it all down with a mix of mineral oil and beezwax.

The handles are slightly offset, but I still like it. It was great to get back to turning. I’m glad the weather is getting warmer!

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A Sconce Makes the Heart Grow Fonder

We recently had the opportunity to replace some sconce light covers. The ones that broke were simply a piece of curved frosted glass. Caroline and the kids made some decorations this summer by melting pony beads in a cupcake pan run with the idea and use it to make some custom sconce covers myself.

I bought a new flat all-metal pan from the thrift store to avoid getting melted plastic all over the pans we use. I would’ve preferred a cookie sheet, but this is what they had.

I bought a bit of clear beads and a bin of transparent color beads. I made sure to get hard beads. I laid the beads out how I wanted them, but I made sure to extend my layout about 2 inches wider and taller than I was going to need. I knew that the plastic puddle would be thinner at the edges.

Laying out the beads
Laying out the beads

I placed the whole pan in the grill on medium-high. I checked on it every few minutes and here’s what happened.

  1. The beads all got shiny. They looked almost wet. I could still touch them at this point and they felt rubbery, but wouldn’t quite stick together.
  2. The beads started to stick together, but were still separate.
  3. They turned into a big puddle.

That took about 10 or 15 minutes. If you checke it less often it will probably take less time.

After it was melted I removed it from the grill and let it cool by itself until I could comfortably touch the bottom of the pan with my bare hands. At this point a slight twist of the pan made the plastic sheet pop off.

On an initial trial run I tried pulling the plastic off before it was all the way hardened and it left a goopy mess stuck to the bottom of the pan. Wait until it’s cool.

Once both sheets were cooled I used a fine-tooth saw blade on the table saw to trim the edges to make two rectangles.

The next step was to bent it. I actually did this step over the grill, the heat of the grill helped keep the whole piece warm, while the heat gun warmed it enough to actually get back to the bendy stage. I wore a clean(ish) leather glove during this stage so my hand didn’t get too hot.

Be sure to constantly move the heat gun around so you don’t get odd hot spots. They’ll warp and sag.

Bending the formed sheet
Bending the formed sheet

Since I was just barely bringing it up to the bendable stage, all I had to do to harden it was pick it up off the grill and hold it in the cool November Minnesota air.

The curves aren’t perfect, but they didn’t need to be for this. If I wanted exact curves I’d have made a mold out of sheet metal or something and let it droop over the mold.

A sconce after being drilled
A sconce after being drilled

Once it was curved I used a series of sandpaper on the edges to remove the saw blade marks. I used 120, 220, 500, 1200 and steel wool. That left the edges with a hazy white finish. A quick pass with the heat gun healed all those micro-scratches to leave clear edges.

Smoothed and reheated edges
Smoothed and reheated edges

Caroline says she loves them, so I guess the project was a success.

The sconces in action
The sconces in action
Another Action Shot Of A Sconce
Another Action Shot Of A Sconce
Another Action Shot Of A Sconce
Another Action Shot Of A Sconce

Notes:

  • Melting plastic lets off terrible fumes. Keep it outside the whole time it’s warm and don’t do this in the oven. 
  • This works with CFL bulbs because they don’t get hot enough to melt the plastic. This would never work with halogen or incandescent bulbs.
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